odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters
Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.
The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters
Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.
The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters
Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.
The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters
Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.
The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters
Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.
The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
Zoom Info

odditiesoflife:

Japanese Folk Monsters

Several yōkai (Japanese folk monsters) inhabit the upstairs closet at the Kitarō Chaya teahouse in Chōfu (Tōkyō). Visible through peepholes in the door, these traditional monsters are based on old folktales from across Japan.

  • The Otoroshi, a hairy creature, perches atop the gates to shrines and temples, waiting to snatch up impious and ill-intentioned people passing below
  • The Abura-sumashi (lit. “Oil Presser”), a folk monster from Kumamoto prefecture known for harassing mountain travelers, is believed to be the reincarnated spirit of an oil thief.
  • The Kappa, probably the most well-known yōkai in Japan, is a mischievous and often dangerous river imp.
  • The Tsuchigumo is a large blood-sucking spider sometimes found under the floorboards of old houses.
  • The Kurage no Hinotama is a jellyfish-shaped fireball found near the sea is a floating apparition that discharges a sticky red sap-like substance when threatened.
gaywrites:

It’s official! President Obama has signed an executive order granting workplace equality to LGBT federal workers. This is a historic day — but we’re not done yet. Next up, let’s enact workplace protections for every LGBT employee, everywhere in the country. 
Zoom Info
gaywrites:

It’s official! President Obama has signed an executive order granting workplace equality to LGBT federal workers. This is a historic day — but we’re not done yet. Next up, let’s enact workplace protections for every LGBT employee, everywhere in the country. 
Zoom Info

gaywrites:

It’s official! President Obama has signed an executive order granting workplace equality to LGBT federal workers. This is a historic day — but we’re not done yet. Next up, let’s enact workplace protections for every LGBT employee, everywhere in the country.